When my nose isn’t pressed firmly to the grindstone of work, which it tends to be nowadays, I often have a 60 minute to 90 minute daily sabbatical of a dog walk with the most recent addition to the family, a rescue border collie, who is delightful.

Working from home is wonderful, but when I was first anchored here, I had to force myself to go out.

Not because I’d developed some sort of Boo Radley social fear, but simply because I was totally focused on copywriting, social media management for clients (and myself) and freelance web design.

Adopting a dog in September 2018 changed all that.

I can’t stay glued to my Mac in my foxy home office when there’s a tail-wagging daily frenzy which translates into – “Put the work down and get me walked.”

Gladly too.

4 miles most days in all conditions is good for body and mind, I meet and chat with people, whereas without a dog, some Nimby would no doubt be calling the police about a tall, careworn man, who wanders woods daily.

If you know Bradwell and Gorleston, I’d recommend this walk. It’s got advantages in that it’s easily accessible by car or on foot and is impressive as the A143 and A47 (A12 as was) are not audible en route.

There’s a new road, connecting the A47 and A143, where we live on Bluebell Meadow and a 150 yard stroll takes me daily to a deserted footpath that passes just 4 houses on its 3 mile length and takes in mud, puddles and woods, which the dog, Cassie, loves, even when asked to sit in arctic conditions:

The route takes you south along the muddy bridleway, and when you pass two cottages on the left, that’s your cue to turn left for Bluebell Woods, which is decked with bluebells in April and May.

A stile crossed, with a big house to your right, you can go across the field, or turn left into the woods. I mix it every day to keep it real, generally preferring the field traverse.

In the woods, you can’t go wrong. There’s a part signed Keep Out which leads to a dead end anyway near Hobland Kennels, and you can wend round Beacon Park and actually leave the woods near the Captain Manby. 

I tend to head back to the new road, and again, it’s a walk that I enjoy most days as you witness seasonal change close at hand. 

Back on the new road, or Nurburgring, as I prefer to call it, as 30 mph seems to be flouted by every driver on there, and the few, who stick to it, are overtaken relentlessly by bellend drivers, it seems to me.

You can then cross the pruned wood to Woodfarm lane and weave back to Beccles Road via a bridlepath next to Ormiston Venture (Oriel High as was) or cross the field and footings of the next Persimmon phase.

There’s wildlife in abundance – pink-footed geese, various birds of prey, Muntjac deer and squirrels. Lots of squirrels. 

I’d recommend it and if you see me en route after reading this, say hello to me. 

I’m not a Norfolk local but I am northern and friendly.